Do I Need An Attorney for My Social Security Claim?

Here at my law firm, I am often asked whether there is an advantage to having a lawyer represent a claimant in a Social Security Disability case. After all, isn’t the Social Security Administration (SSA) around for the sole purpose of getting you SSD benefits when you need them? Based on the information gathered from a recent study, the SSA might not be as friendly as anticipated, and an attorney is more worthwhile than you might think.

According to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and its study that it released last year, you are noticeably likely to receive more benefits if you’re represented by an attorney when you file your Social Security claim. Of the 598,000 Social Security claims they reviewed, those who had an attorney received 50% more benefits than those who did not. Although the Social Security Administration (SSA) does not require claimants to have an attorney, the results from the GAO’s study shows claimants with representation are more likely to be awarded benefits than those without representation.

It is my view, as a Social Security claimant’s representative, that I add clear and real value to my clients’ cases. I make it more likely that my clients will be awarded benefits and, when they are given benefits, they are all the more likely to receive even more, rather than a minimal amount. To help you develop your case and present it to the Social Security Administration, I provide your case all the knowledge and legal insight I have gained across my decades of legal experience. I understand what must be proven in order to win your case, and how to prove it.

Without an attorney, though, you are reliant on a Social Security Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) to develop your case and conclude it based on their discretion. The ALJ has an obligation to fully develop the record, but trust me when I tell you, I do a better job in developing the record for my clients than is done by an ALJ. Indeed, the same GAO study found a 46 point gap of benefit allowance rates among Social Security ALJs, which means the ALJ that approves the most cases does so 46% more often than the ALJ that disapproves the most cases. Do you really want to gamble with odds so out of your favor? I think not!

Give my law firm a call at (855) 801-1633, or send me an email, and I would be happy to discuss your case. As Iowa’s most trusted Social Security Disability law firm, you can rest easy knowing a real legal leader is on your side.

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